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Transportation Services

As part of our mission to break down barriers to inclusion for people with disabilities, we're committed to helping those we serve get where they need, and want, to go via accessible transportation. Through the National Aging and Disability Transportation Center, we help people find rides and transportation resources to reach employment, appointments, shopping and other destinations.

NADTC logoThe National Aging and Disability Transportation Center can help people with disabilities and older adults find out about their community’s available transportation services and connect individuals with transportation operators and mobility managers who can assist in finding transportation when they need it.

Steps to helping you or your client find transportation:

Step 1 – Identify Transportation Needs

A woman in a wheelchair using a ramp to board a van

Step 2 – Connect to a Local Mobility Manager

A mobility manager is an employee of a transit or human service agency who offers on-on-one counseling or group education on transportation options and alternatives to driving. A referral to a local mobility manager will put you in touch with a transportation expert who can offer information on transportation services that are available in the area, offer guidance on how to find a ride, and in some cases, arrange or coordinate rides. A mobility manager’s job is to take a person-centered approach to finding the right transportation based on an individual’s needs.

If you are unable to locate a mobility manager, you can reach out to an Information and Referral Specialist, an Aging and Disability Resource Center, or a 2-1-1 program (see Step 3 for phone numbers and websites).

Step 3 – Learn about Transportation Options in Your Community

Creating a comprehensive list of transportation resources and options can be a daunting task, but chances are others in your community may have already done so. Transportation providers in your community are willing, and often eager, to share their expertise and get the word out about transportation services available. Some transportation options are available through one-click websites. Use the following resources:

Preparing to Talk to a Transportation Provider

A woman behind the wheel of a car

Transportation providers will want to know answers to specific questions about you or your client’s travels in order to help them find the best option, and you or your client should be prepared to ask any questions you have to better understand the service. The National Aging and Disability Transportation Center has prepared a sheet of questions and information you, your client, or family and caregivers will want to address when deciding on the type of transportation service to use.

Need more information?

To read up on the types of transportation available, download a full copy of the NADTC Information brief Identifying and Overcoming Transportation Barriers for Clients at www.nadtc.org. To speak with a technical assistance specialist about additional Easterseals transportation resources, call toll-free (866) 983-3222 or email contact@nadtc.org.

Community Transportation Planning and Community Engagement

Are you planning for or implementing transportation services in your community to expand options for people with disabilities, older adults or travelers of all ages? Do you need practical assistance with inter-agency facilitation, policy development or public engagement? Contact Easterseals Project Action Consulting, a division of Easterseals that provides customized training solutions and technical expertise on the Americans with Disabilities Act and accessible transportation for transportation providers, human service agencies, states, regional agencies, and tribal nations. Learn more at www.projectaction.com, call toll-free (844) 227-3772, or email espaconsulting@easterseals.com.

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