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State Autism Profiles: Indiana

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DEMOGRAPHICS

In 2000, 3,077 or 1.97% of children ages 3-21 who received special education services in Indiana have autism. In 2013-2014, 14,231 or 8.38% of children with disabilities ages 3-21 who received special education services have autism.

Table 1-1: IDEA Part B - Children with Autism in Indiana for 1999-2000 and 2014-2015
(Child Count by Age Group)

  1999-20002014-2015
Age 3-5

 456

1,027

Age 6-21

 2,621

13,701

Age 3-21

 3,077

14,737

Source: Reported by the State of Indiana in accordance with Section 618 of IDEA to U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs

Table 1-2: IDEA Part B - Children with Disabilities in Indiana for 1999-2000 and 2014-2015
(Child Count by Age Group)

  1999-20002014-2015
Age 3-5

15,101

17,931

Age 6-11

 73,852

72,078

Age 12-17

60,770

70,591

Age 18-21

 6,597

9.865

Age 6-21

 141,219

152,534

Age 3-21

 156,320

170,465

Source: Reported by the State of Indiana in accordance with Section 618 of IDEA to U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs

STATE TASK FORCE

Indiana Commission on Autism
The Indiana Commission on Autism was established under Indiana Code 12-11-7. The commission was comprised of fourteen members designated by the Speaker of the House and the President Pro Tempore of the Senate who are each allowed to designate four legislative members and three others. In February 2007, the commission prepared a report, “Indiana Comprehensive State Plan to Guide Services for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders,” with an interagency cooperation agreement. The report reviewed the service delivery systems and effectiveness of programs for individuals with autism. Sen. David Long (R-Fort Wayne) served as the chair, and Speaker B. Patrick Bauer (South Bend) served as the vice-chair.
http://www.ai.org/legislative/interim/committee/auti.html

Upon the submission of the report, the Indiana Interagency Autism Coordinating Council (IIACC) was established to oversee the implementation of the recommendations outlined in the state plan. The IIACC is a consortium of several Indiana agencies, providers, and governmental departments that work together to advance issues related to persons in Indiana with autism. Creation and execution of the IIACC is mandated by the Indiana Comprehensive State Plan for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and, since 2007, is facilitated by the Autism Society of Indiana.

STATE INSURANCE COVERAGE

In 2001, the 112th General Assembly passed H.B. 1122 and was enrolled as Indiana Code 27-8-14.2, known as the “Autism Insurance Mandate.” Under Indiana Code 27-8-14.2, group health insurance coverage is required for pervasive developmental disorders, which include autism and Asperger’s syndrome. Individual health plans are required to provide an option offering coverage for autism spectrum disorders. Coverage is limited to treatment prescribed in accordance to a treatment plan prescribed by healthcare provider. Pervasive developmental disorders are defined as a neurological condition. Simultaneously, the General Assembly passed H.B. 1047 which defines autism as a neurological condition, consistent with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders of the American Psychiatric Association. Unlike many states, the law in Indiana includes coverage of autism services by self-insured plans.
Ind. Code § 27-8-14.2-1 et seq. and § 27-13-7-14.7 (http://www.in.gov/legislative/ic/code/title27/ar13/ch7.html

ESSENTIAL HEALTH BENEFITS

Under the Affordable Care Act, Indiana will continue to offer autism services including applied behavioral analysis (ABA) on its federally-run exchange. Indiana’s benchmark plan has not placed autism services under a specified Essential Health Benefit.
(Anthem Ins. Companies Inc. (Anthem BCBS); Blue 5 Blue Access PPO Medical Option 6 Rx Option G)

MEDICAID

Indiana Medicaid covers medically necessary autism services, including Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), under traditional Medicaid as part of the Early Pediatric Screening Diagnosis and treatment (EPSDT) program for children with a medical diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder.
http://innovationsinlearning.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/MedicaidEPSDTAutismCoverageCollabLetterFinal.pdf

Indiana Home and Community-Based Services Waiver: IN Community Integration and Habilitation
This waiver, implemented on October 1, 2014, provides services including residential habilitation and support, respite, supported employment, psychological therapy, speech and language therapy, adult foster care, behavioral support, community-based habilitation, community transition, electronic monitoring, environmental modifications, facility-based habilitation, facility-based support services, family and caregiver training, intensive behavior intervention, music therapy, PERS, recreational therapy, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation, and workplace assistance for individuals of all ages with autism, intellectual disability, and developmental disabilities. This waiver expires on September 30, 2019.

Indiana Home and Community-Based Services Waiver: IN Family Support Services
This waiver, implemented on April 1, 2010, provides services including psychological therapy, speech and language therapy, behavioral support services, community-based habilitation, facility-based habilitation, facility-based support services, family and caregiver training, intensive behavioral intervention, music therapy, PERS, recreational therapy, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation, and workplace assistance for individuals of all ages with autism, intellectual disability, and developmental disabilities. This waiver expires on March 31, 2020.
http://www.medicaid.gov/Medicaid-CHIP-Program-Information/By-State/Waiver-Descript-Factsheet/IN-Waiver-Factsheet.html#IN4151

EDUCATION

Indiana Administrative Code Article 7 provides guidelines for special education. Rule 26 specifies the eligibility categories and criteria for disabilities, which include autism. In 2007, the 115th General Assembly passed H.B. 1428 requiring officers within a school corporation police force to receive training on how to work with students with autism. Additionally, the law allows schools to have their staff receive training or education on autism.
http://www.in.gov/legislative/bills/2007/HE/HE1428.1.html

EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES

Autism Training for Law Enforcement
On April 30, 2015 the Governor signed HB 1242 requiring the law enforcement training police reserve officers to complete mandatory training in interacting with persons with disabilities, mental illness, addictive disorders, autism and other developmental disabilities.
https://iga.in.gov/legislative/2015/bills/house/1242

Autism Training for Emergency Responders
H.B. 1455 was introduced on January 13, 2009 to require law enforcement personnel and firefighters to undergo training on interacting with individuals with autism spectrum disorders. The legislation was signed into law by the governor on May 6, 2009 and went into effect on July 1, 2009. Section 2 of the new law, which will take effect on January 1, 2010, requires the Department of Education create a document explaining autism to be distributed to school corporations for distribution to noncertified employees. This required training for law enforcement personnel and firefighters was reinstated on March 12, 2010 in S.B. 222.
http://www.iidc.indiana.edu/pages/first-responder-training

Behavior Analyst Certification
While Indiana does not have licensing of Behavior Analysts, the legislature did pass a law in 2008 prohibiting anyone in the state who is not certified as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board from using that title or BCBA, or professing to be a certified behavior analyst An individual who knowingly, intentionally, or recklessly does so commits a Class B misdemeanor
http://www.in.gov/legislative/bills/2008/HE/HE1288.1.html

OTHER STATE RESOURCES

Indiana Resource Center for Autism
Indiana Code 12-11-8 authorized the Developmental Training Center at the Indiana University in Bloomington to establish a resource center for autism. The resource center provides information on federal, state, and local services to families of a child with autism. In addition, the resource center offers training and technical system about autism. Every three years, the resource center is expected to conduct a statewide assessment on the status of services provided to individuals with autism and to identify additional needs for support services.
http://www.iidc.indiana.edu/index.php?pageId=32

STATE LEGISLATIVE CALENDAR

The Indiana General Assembly meets each year. The 2016 General Session convened on January 5, 2016 and adjourned on March 10, 2016. The 2017 session is expected to convene in January 2017 and adjourn in mid-March of the same year.
http://www.in.gov/legislative/


Sponsors of Autism Legislation

  • Sen. Ed Charbonneau (R-Valparaiso) District 5
  • Sen. Patricia Miller (R-Indianapolis) District 32
  • Rep. Karlee Macer (D-Indianapolis) District 92
  • Rep. Vanessa Summers (D-Indianapolis) District 99

Prepared by Easterseals, Inc.; November 2016.

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